From CC-BY to CC-Zero

I’ve never been satisfied with “attribution” part of Creative Commons licenses and obviously I’m not alone in this camp. The main issue is that while CC terms require attribution in the manner required by author, parties resharing the creative work rarely check these requirements. Frequently authors of images posted to Flickr complain that some high profile site used “nickname at flickr” instead of whatever author had asked for. Very recently I’ve had an interesting discussion on the same topic, but it didn’t end with anything else than a common feeling that the system is a bit broken (or completely broken, depends who you ask).

However, instead of going back to copyrighting my work again (pretty frequent move in graphics communities), I’ve decided to follow good practice (of Bill Hooker‘s for example) and waive all the rights to the original content of this blog in the form of Creative Commons Zero waiver. It didn’t make sense to use CC-BY anymore if I hadn’t been happy with it.

This move had quite a few inspirations (such as a recent thread on scholarly articles and public domain on Open Science mailing list), the discussion mentioned above, public domain dedications coming from bloggers with high-traffic sites etc. So, yes, I’m aware that I’m just joining the wave. However with an aim of making it stronger.

1 Comment so far

  1. PaweĊ‚, unfortunately in Poland the CC Zero waiver does not work, as it is illegal to waive your copyrights and move works to the public domain. This might strike you as ironic, but the waiver defaults in such situations to… CC-BY.

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