All posts filed under “Complex systems

The evolution of selves by open citizen science

This post summarizes my current focus in area of open science. Whether concepts presented here could make their way into practice, that’s still to be seen. So, consider this a work in progress. I’m happy to be proven wrong, change my opinion or get myself sold into other ideas. On (open) science Science (like almost everything else in the world) needs a major transformation, as it no longer serves its purpose in the most efficient manner. For that reason I…

Data science: cost of mistakes

Michael Nielsen some other day shared a story on how researchers are using Twitter to predict stock market movements. The idea wasn’t actually that new – there were other attempts to use Twitter (and not only that) to predict stock prices. And actually it’s fairly easy to come up with another source of signal that will nicely correlate with the market (if you don’t believe that, look for performance figures of astrology-based trading – numbers are quite amazing). However, one…

Going beyond a single scientific journal or scientific community

Image by Rain Rabbit via Flickr I’ve written previously about an utopian idea of having one scientific journal and one scientific community. And while it’s hard to expect this vision comes true anytime soon, surprisingly we are getting closer to it day by day. Sciverse is currently excited about NPG launching new journal called Scientific Reports, which resembles PLoS ONE so much it was already called Nature ONE. One more journal doesn’t sound like a step in good direction, but…

Science as a complex system – introduction

Image via Wikipedia Which complex system? Complexity theory, that is studying complex systems, is tracked back to 18th century with classical political economy of the Scottish Enlightenment, although the real pioneers of the field are 20th century’s philosophers, economists, mathematicians and social scientists. It’s a rather young field, but it already covers quite large number of topics (such as complex adaptive systems, chaos theory, non-linearity, emergence or self-organization) and which influences other fields of science, like biology, sociology or economics….

Complex systems and technology

Image via Wikipedia Two months ago I was speaking over at TEDxWulkan – it was a TEDx-like event inspired by the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull and its theme was inspired by a well known (at least for fans of Sean Connery) movie line “It’s impossible. But doable.” The video of my short talk is now posted on YouTube. My point was that inspiration for modern technology could come not only from certain solutions found in living systems but also (or mainly) the…

Available and relevant

Great question is asked on EPT blog: What would be the consequence of just a single butterfly wing-flap in, say, Sweden on some new medical development in Peru? For researchers to be able to use a new development from the opposite side of the world, such development simply has to be be available. Without OA, knowledge cannot have the same impact as it could have if it’s freely available soon after it’s created. But OA is one part of equation…