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Open science and the economic collapse

My colleague is interested in designing a better PCR machine and is collecting all the hardware information he can get. Today, after I’ve forwarded him a link to OpenPCR, a project aiming at constructing open source PCR hardware that anyone can build, he asked me what’s the point of making biotech equipment by yourself in […]

Open Foo: sharing practice, social movement and technology

In the discussion under my recent post on incompatibilities between open source and open data Bill Anderson pointed out frequent confusion between “open source” and “free software”. He cited Richard Stallman’s essay which argues that open source is a software development methodology, while free software is a social movement. Building on that, Bill wrote that […]

Open Data citation advantage

Quite recently my colleagues published a paper on genome-wide model of translation (in PLoS Computational Biology). They have used a number of different data, although in one case the data wasn’t available in the text or as a supplementary material – they needed to ask the other group for certain raw numbers from their experiment […]

Science as a complex system – introduction

Image via Wikipedia Which complex system? Complexity theory, that is studying complex systems, is tracked back to 18th century with classical political economy of the Scottish Enlightenment, although the real pioneers of the field are 20th century’s philosophers, economists, mathematicians and social scientists. It’s a rather young field, but it already covers quite large number […]

Open data and open source. Incompatible?

Open data movement seemingly doesn’t differ much from other “open” movements – its goal is to have  free access to data (you can substitute data for articles/source code/creative content) without certain restrictions and mechanisms of control. Quite recently a group of usuall suspects (Cameron Neylon, John Wilbanks, Peter Murray-Rust and Rufus Pollock) put together a […]

Importance of meatspace – session at Science Online 2010

Image via Wikipedia This is long-overdue report of the session on science freelancing and science coworking at Science Online 2010 that I’ve co-moderated with Brian Russell from Carrboro Creative Coworking. In the first part of the session I described shortly my journey from being freelance scientists (posts documenting ca. a year of being freelance scientist: […]